For the past few decades the Boeing Airplane Company has, without doubt, been the most successful manufacturer of commercial aircraft, particularly since the introduction of the jet era. The Boeing 707 can be claimed to be the aircraft which changes transatlantic travel whilst the 727 became the world's best-selling airliner. That record has since been lost but, to another Boeing product, the 737, which at the time of writing has amassed an amazing 3,053 orders, 2,650 of which have been delivered. The success of the 747 Jumbo is legendary, but two other Boeing products, the 757 and 767 are also selling extremely well. On 14 July 1978 Boeing announced that it was to proceed with the manufacture of the twin-engined 767 model following an order from United Airlines for thirty aircraft. Developed simultaneously with the 757, the 767 was aimed primarily at transcontinental and intercontinental routes. In appearance the 767 is similar to the Airbus A-300, powered by two wing mounted turbofan engines, and the customer has a choice of General Electric, Pratt & Whitney or Rolls-Royce engines. The wide body fuselage has twin-aisles with seven abreast seating in a 2x3x2 configuration, though this is often increased to 2x4x2 in charter configuration. The 767 is assembled in a new building adjoining the 747 assembly hangar at Boeing's Everett plant, which shares the runway with Paine Field/Snohomish County airport. The basic model is designated the 767-200, and the prototype was rolled out on 4 August 1981 with the first flight on 26 September, five months ahead of the 757 which is produced at Renton.